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I am certainly not alone...

PostPosted: Fri 04 Jun, 2010 6:00 pm
by LadySnowcat
My weekend started well when I found a subscriber only article on the Autosport website by their rallies correspondent, David Evans, and he thinks Kimi is doing just fine...

His closing comment was...

"And, irrespective of where he finished in Portugal, Raikkonen remains one of the finest drivers ever to grace the globe.

Keep the faith."


And, of course, I will...

I am not sure if you can read it if you aren't a subscriber but just in case it's here..

http://www.autosport.com/features/article.php/id/2847

Re: I am certainly not alone...

PostPosted: Fri 04 Jun, 2010 7:09 pm
by vikki
Devoid of many of the mechanical, electronic and hydraulic aids packed into the current motors, the 2011-spec WRCs will be built for drivers.

i hadn't even realised they are changing the regs.interesting point.tbh for most f1 fans i suspect kimi could win the wrc driving backwards and blindfolded and it wouldn't register. but i think he's doing quite well so far and should do even better next year. :nod:

Re: I am certainly not alone...

PostPosted: Fri 04 Jun, 2010 8:33 pm
by Sculptor
Why bother subscribing when you can get it free:

While his Citroen Junior team-mate Sebastien Ogier stole the headlines with victory on Rally Portugal, Kimi Raikkonen continued his steady progress in the WRC. David Evans explains why those writing off the Finn are jumping the gun

The Citroen Junior Team topped and tailed the top 10 of last week's Rally of Portugal. Countless words have been written about Sebastien Ogier, who finished first in Faro. Not so many will be read about Kimi Raikkonen at the other end of the leaderboard.

Having committed plenty of paragraphs to the C4 WRC driver who hasn't won a Formula 1 World Championship, I'm now going to redress that balance.

It's amazing how quickly the rumblings of discontent have come in the case of Raikkonen. Certainly, he hasn't come in and set the WRC alight, but was it really sensible to expect that? Of course it wasn't.

What Raikkonen has done is a solid and sensible job. He's made the odd mistake here and there, his Mexico shunt being the biggest of these, but last week's Rally of Portugal was another example of him doing the spadework for what will, hopefully, be his home for the next few years.

Raikkonen said from the start that he would be driving for a finish on the Algarve. And that's what he did. He'd been out of the car for more than a month and had never competed on the event before. And, believe me, having driven some of the stages, there's nothing straightforward about the Portuguese roads.

In many ways, making pace notes for Portugal is more difficult than somewhere like Finland; there's crest after crest with corners often coming on or just after them. And no tree line to follow. Round six was undoubtedly the biggest challenge of Raikkonen's note-making ability yet.

And, more importantly, it was only the seventh time he'd ever done that on a round of the WRC. That's the bit which, for me, highlights Raikkonen's efforts. He remains a novice in the sport, but because he's succeeded at the highest level in something else with four wheels around him, there's a natural expectation that he's going to hop into a World Rally Car and do the same thing.

Forget it.

I've talked to a few of the older fellas in motorsport about Raikkonen and they're baffled by the relative lack of pace from the former Ferrari driver.

"He's no Jim Clark, is he?" was the classic line from one.

How on earth can you try to answer that? Of course he's not. The Lotus Clark drove in 1963 and 1965 was an uncomplicated motor racing machine. Raikkonen's 2007 Ferrari probably has more in common with the Space Shuttle than Clark's V8-powered 25. Switching from the Lotus to a Ford Cortina for the 1966 RAC Rally was considerably easier than what Raikkonen's trying to do.

When Clark came close to winning Britain's biggest rally, the car he was using bore little resemblance to the one he'd used to lap some of the world's finest circuits. But the similarities were considerably stronger than between Kimi's Ferrari and the C4.

Raikkonen's faced with a myriad of differential maps and a plethora of bump and rebound damper options and that's before he's even scratched the surface of what the current World Rally Car is capable of. For Clark, the car set-up options wouldn't have stretched much beyond having the windscreen wipers on or off.

I'm absolutely in no way undermining what Clark achieved. How could you? He was a genius behind the wheel of everything he stepped into. My point is merely that you can't compare generations. It just doesn't work.

One thing is for sure, though: Raikkonen's talent, commitment and bravery are beyond question. Those who are thinking he hasn't got what it takes to barrel a Citroen down the road as fast as Loeb or Ogier should a) wait a season or two and b) give a damp Eau Rouge a go flat in top.

And another thing is absolutely for sure: Raikkonen is hating his lot right now.

He walks around the service park with his trademark set-up of Red Bull cap hunkered down over big dark shades, not really wanting to talk to the world. Why would he want to? People want to know why he's not winning. People tend to ask stupid questions and he has no interest in giving the uneducated the time of day. They don't get it. They never will.

But underneath the hat and behind the sunnies is a desperately determined driver. You don't become world champion without massive commitment and an extraordinary talent. Raikkonen has both. He's forgotten neither. And, with more time in the Citroen C4 – and hopefully the DS3 WRC next year – his time will come to emulate Clark.

The next generation of World Rally Cars, coming for the start of next season, could really suit Raikkonen. Devoid of many of the mechanical, electronic and hydraulic aids packed into the current motors, the 2011-spec WRCs will be built for drivers.

And, irrespective of where he finished in Portugal, Raikkonen remains one of the finest drivers ever to grace the globe.

Keep the faith.
;)

Re: I am certainly not alone...

PostPosted: Fri 04 Jun, 2010 11:00 pm
by Kop Alonso
Not you are not alone ....there are two of you now ...



:shake:

Re: I am certainly not alone...

PostPosted: Fri 04 Jun, 2010 11:03 pm
by Kop Alonso
I always thought Kimi should have entered the IRC not the WRC...

>>>>>:L

Re: I am certainly not alone...

PostPosted: Sun 06 Jun, 2010 4:41 pm
by Kop Alonso

Re: I am certainly not alone...

PostPosted: Mon 07 Jun, 2010 7:44 am
by LadySnowcat
Oooo...

Thanks KA... excellent interview...

It's really good to know that the move to rallying hasn't changed the Kimster one bit...

Re: I am certainly not alone...

PostPosted: Mon 07 Jun, 2010 3:54 pm
by Daniel
I've had a bit of a WRC fest the last few days, catching up with it on my girlfriends sky+

Portugal wasn't great for Kimi, finishing several minutes behind his team mate who won. He was 8th for a while, but must have had an off in the last stage and dropped to 10th, while his team mate won. But it's not really fair to compare Kimi to seb 2.0, even if they are driving the same car. Ogier has more experience than Kimi and is clearly a big tellent of the future.

I'm not an expert in WRC, and am learning at the same time Kimi is, but it looks like he's doing ok to me. He's getting experience and scoring points and has had a couple of good finishes so far.

It doesn't look like Kimi in WRC is a passing fling, he looks like he's committed to it, so I'll be hoping that by 2011 (when I'll hopefully know what's going on a bit more) Kimi will be up to speed and a bit closer to the front.